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tlazer
12-17-2008, 03:34 AM
I;m not a child of the fifties but I remember seeing pictures that my parents had of their Xmas tree's back then.I like those tree's.were all the trees sparse like that or were there different types also? If you ever watched the Bishops Wife( With Cary Grant) that;s the type of tree I'm referring to. :christmastree:

Merry Christmas Darling
12-17-2008, 06:28 AM
I;m not a child of the fifties but I remember seeing pictures that my parents had of their Xmas tree's back then.I like those tree's.were all the trees sparse like that or were there different types also? If you ever watched the Bishops Wife( With Cary Grant) that;s the type of tree I'm referring to. :christmastree:

No, they weren't all like that. My grandparents and my aunt had tabletop artificial trees. My stepfather didn't want my mother to buy a fresh cut tree. We had a Japanese yew in a pot one year. It was weird. I was happy when he was gone and she bought the kind of tree you're talking about. But the next year(1959/60?) she bought a lop-sided Scotch pine and her three oldest kids never let her live that down. :sad elf: We reminded her every year not to get that kind again. :santahat: At school in Florida, we had some pretty sorry looking long-needled pines(worse than Scotch pines). So in the sixties it was back to the beautiful sparse short-needled trees; I think the growers must have trimmed the rows of in between branches as the trees were growing. By 1970 everyone had full, fat trees.

steph535
12-17-2008, 07:04 AM
I was born in the 50's but I don't remember anything about it, really. But, as far back as I can remember, most people seemed to like Scotch pines, but we always got something my mother called a 'double balsam.' She said this was different from a 'single balsam' because the needles went all the way around each little branch on the double. Now, these were not quite as sparse as the one in "The Bishop's Wife," but were certainly much sparser than a Scotch pine. My mother taught us the beauty of being able to hang ornaments on the inside of the tree as well as the outside; it was magical for me as a child because everywhere you looked, there was something new to explore that caught your eye and imagination. And my parents always used the mini-lights; well, from what I recall. It seemed that the folks who had the Scotch pines liked to use the big lights, the C 7's and/or C9's. And because the Scotch pines were thick, the ornaments seemed like they were just draped on. Regarding balsam fir trees; you can't find one like you used to; for a long time now, they shear them so they are very thick and not nearly as pretty, in my opinion. Anyway, I do like the way Christmas trees used to look, ok not the Scotch Pines, but the ones we had in the '50's and '60's and like the one in that movie. By the way, I have searched many times for 'double balsams' and it seems there is no such thing anymore. Even if you google it, nothing comes up.:snowman::carols:

m4816k
12-17-2008, 08:32 AM
Bottom of page 25 of "Share your photos!"; my last year's tree...that's probably what you're refering to. Many folks here in Europe still have these kinds of trees because of the traditional look.

Here are some links you might like:

http://www.gymnasium-meschede.de/projekte/projekt12-04/images/Tannenbaum.jpg

http://www.feiertaginfos.de/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/weihnachtsbaum.jpg

http://www.okej.de/img/wordpress/weihnachtsbaum_2007.jpg

Merry Christmas Darling
12-17-2008, 09:31 AM
I was born in the 50's but I don't remember anything about it, really. But, as far back as I can remember, most people seemed to like Scotch pines, but we always got something my mother called a 'double balsam.' She said this was different from a 'single balsam' because the needles went all the way around each little branch on the double. Now, these were not quite as sparse as the one in "The Bishop's Wife," but were certainly much sparser than a Scotch pine. My mother taught us the beauty of being able to hang ornaments on the inside of the tree as well as the outside; it was magical for me as a child because everywhere you looked, there was something new to explore that caught your eye and imagination. And my parents always used the mini-lights; well, from what I recall. It seemed that the folks who had the Scotch pines liked to use the big lights, the C 7's and/or C9's. And because the Scotch pines were thick, the ornaments seemed like they were just draped on. Regarding balsam fir trees; you can't find one like you used to; for a long time now, they shear them so they are very thick and not nearly as pretty, in my opinion. Anyway, I do like the way Christmas trees used to look, ok not the Scotch Pines, but the ones we had in the '50's and '60's and like the one in that movie. By the way, I have searched many times for 'double balsams' and it seems there is no such thing anymore. Even if you google it, nothing comes up.:snowman::carols:

A Douglas fir (not a true fir) has dark green or blue green needles that radiate out in all directions from the branch. They are shipped to areas not subject to intense freezing conditions so I imagine they have been popular in Florida. One reason they shear them is to look for plant diseases and insects.

My mother always used her C-7 lights on the fir trees that she bought in Florida, Virginia, and New Jersey.

lynnenc
12-17-2008, 02:57 PM
I have always missed the simplicity of that imperfect tree of years ago - we went to artificial trees very early on - early 70's for numerous reasons but mostly safety. I have found that over the years if you use the same tree you end up decorating it the same (if you use the same ornaments) . I tend to choose artificial trees that have the wider branch spacing and short needles like the older live trees because I want the ornaments to be the star of my tree not the tree itself. When it all comes down to it I think every Christmas is beautiful if decorated with love ......

Lynne:christmastree:

jadeblue
12-17-2008, 03:32 PM
Hope the recession doesn't affect the number of gifts you are expecting.. lol

steph535
12-17-2008, 04:32 PM
marshmallowworld, douglas firs are very lovely trees, and I have had some of those, back when I used to get a real tree. I would say the "double balsams" (my mom called them that) were most like the frasier fir of today, only not as full. The needles on a douglas fir are longer than the ones on the trees I grew up with. Also, I grew up in Michigan. I have only been in Florida a few years. And, I did not know all those reasons for shearing, so thanks for the info, it is interesting. I had been told some years ago that it is done to make the tree grow thicker, because most people don't like the sparse trees. :christmastree:

onemagicalchristmas
12-17-2008, 07:17 PM
Bottom of page 25 of "Share your photos!"; my last year's tree...that's probably what you're refering to. Many folks here in Europe still have these kinds of trees because of the traditional look.

Here are some links you might like:

http://www.gymnasium-meschede.de/projekte/projekt12-04/images/Tannenbaum.jpg

http://www.feiertaginfos.de/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/weihnachtsbaum.jpg

http://www.okej.de/img/wordpress/weihnachtsbaum_2007.jpg

thanks for the links I love those types of trees. I would love a real tree but who can afford $40.00 for a tree. plus I put mine up in October so real ones wouldn't hold up that long! :blowing:

Merry Christmas Darling
12-18-2008, 01:12 AM
marshmallowworld, douglas firs are very lovely trees, and I have had some of those, back when I used to get a real tree. I would say the "double balsams" (my mom called them that) were most like the frasier fir of today, only not as full. The needles on a douglas fir are longer than the ones on the trees I grew up with. Also, I grew up in Michigan. I have only been in Florida a few years. And, I did not know all those reasons for shearing, so thanks for the info, it is interesting. I had been told some years ago that it is done to make the tree grow thicker, because most people don't like the sparse trees. :christmastree:

Well, I believe you are absolutely right about the shearing making a fuller tree. It probably has a double purpose.

m4816k
12-18-2008, 07:57 AM
thanks for the links I love those types of trees. I would love a real tree but who can afford $40.00 for a tree. plus I put mine up in October so real ones wouldn't hold up that long! :blowing:

I have a recipe for the budget problem - I get only 1 or 2 new ornaments every year, and sometimes they're even handmade i.e. recycled old ornaments (for example this year I figured I have 2 old glass balls and will apply cotton balls to them, making snowball ornaments). That way I can have a natural tree every year. I also don't have two dozen sets of lights (I have just two sets), and for a sparse tree you really don't need a lot of ornaments altogether. I also find some pinecones and other free stuff (my old ceramic figurines, dried flowers etc.) and transform them into ornaments. I also don't have a color scheme and the lights are multicolored, so combining that with a natural tree makes it impossible to decorate exactly the same way two times (there are no two identical natural trees).

And regarding you decorating the tree early on, well, I heard of people who bought trees with a root (common thing here) and planted them in a pot before decorating. After holidays they just took the whole thing on the balcony or in their garden, watered and nurtured during the year and had the same tree not just next year, but even for 5 years in a row! Of course there's no gurarantee that every tree will live like that, but they say it's worth a shot.

onemagicalchristmas
12-18-2008, 04:29 PM
that would be an idea. I will give it some thought. I would love to have a real tree. I love the smell of the pine needles. :santahat:

daflyboy04
12-22-2008, 03:14 AM
yea i remember christmas trees always being the same

onemagicalchristmas
12-22-2008, 04:08 AM
I remember when you could get a good tree for $20.00 but now they cost a fortune. I wouldn't mind buying one with roots so I could replant it after I use it. but where would one go to get one like that!?

m4816k
12-22-2008, 07:47 AM
OMC, I'm not sure about American customs of selling trees, but here you can always choose between a rooted tree and a cut one. Maybe not always at the same vendor, but if one doesen't carry something, the other one does. And most folks buy from small manufacturers who have both versions available. I was thinking of getting a rooted one this year, but ended up buying a cut one after all. It's still outside, and is moving in tomorrow evening to acclimatize before getting decorated the next day.

As to the prices, rooted ones are always more expensive - mine cost me 20$. Here you can get away with even cheaper trees if you buy one a day before Christmas; did that last year and got away with paying just 6$ for a (cut) tree just under 6ft tall. Of course that's not such a small amount here, with an average wage of 600$, but that's another topic.

Merry Christmas Darling
12-22-2008, 08:16 AM
I remember when you could get a good tree for $20.00 but now they cost a fortune. I wouldn't mind buying one with roots so I could replant it after I use it. but where would one go to get one like that!?

I would go to a local nursery.

onemagicalchristmas
12-22-2008, 07:09 PM
I will have to research local nursery for a tree next year. it doesn't have to be big just adorable!:merrychristmas:

m4816k
12-23-2008, 12:21 PM
After watching Home alone last night I figured Kevin had one just like that, decorated in my favorite theme - no theme at all:santa-smiley:

gogopanda
12-24-2008, 03:01 AM
Bottom of page 25 of "Share your photos!"; my last year's tree...that's probably what you're refering to. Many folks here in Europe still have these kinds of trees because of the traditional look.

Here are some links you might like:

http://www.gymnasium-meschede.de/projekte/projekt12-04/images/Tannenbaum.jpg

http://www.feiertaginfos.de/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/weihnachtsbaum.jpg

http://www.okej.de/img/wordpress/weihnachtsbaum_2007.jpg


They look nice, but they actually also look fake to me =/

onemagicalchristmas
12-24-2008, 03:03 AM
my fake tree almost looks real! now I just need a christmas scent!

Donna-50
01-06-2009, 03:23 PM
my fake tree almost looks real! now I just need a christmas scent!

Try Thyme candles. They have a fir scent that is wonderful. I purchased them online when they had free shipping. They have the tree scent without being overpowering. I bought the votive to try but will be buying more next Christmas.

I loved the trees from years ago when you could see all the ornaments and they always looked wonderful with tinsel.

onemagicalchristmas
01-07-2009, 12:39 AM
thanks I will look for some this year. I also want to check out the rosemary trees this year. a couple years ago I bought one at Lowe's and decorated it for christmas! I love the fragrance it gives off!

Mary Angeldog
01-13-2009, 04:25 PM
I have an older artificial blue spruce which has a lot of space between branch layers so it is somewhat sparse and great for showing off ornaments and lights. It also makes draping the pearl garland I have for that tree much easier.
To get the scent of Christmas I put pine or balsam scented potpourri in an open container at the base of my artificial tree. The tree skirt hides the container but is tied loosely enough around the base of the tree to allow the scent to come through. I freshen the scent weekly with scented oil on the potpourri. Our tree is on a table so investigating the good smell hasn't been a problem with our dogs. You could use scented oil on or in ornaments to get the same effect.

Kittyskyfish
09-10-2009, 05:38 PM
It's time to revive this old thread for the new season! :christmastree:

This is the type of tree my granddad had, although he decorated it with a few strands of larger C7 lights. His also wasn't that big - I think it was only 5' tall?

Heritage Evergreen (http://www.treeclassics.com/heritage-evergreen-pre-lit-artificial-christmas-trees.aspx#)
http://www.treeclassics.com/images/product/medium/heritage-evergreen-med.jpg